The I-70 Killer Takes Form

As I continue to refine the number of pages being prepared on The Quester Files for presenting the case of the I-70 Killer I think it is time to share some frustrations. Yes, much is taking form. There will be much new information. But there is still much frustration. As important as adding new information is to sort out the false information.

The case is subject to nothing but the tritest regurgitation online. Over a couple of decades of news articles have not elaborated at all. When one jurisdiction’s police department did a short video encapsulating what it felt was the relevant evidence to stimulate the public’s help, it presented starkly contradictory evidence to what had been presented in the name of another jurisdiction– e.g. the type of .22 caliber weapon suspected.

According to the earliest news reports, the witness in Wichita saw an “uzi-like” weapon with a banana clip. This suggests the .22 caliber Scorpion. Since 2012, St. Charles Police Police say the weapon was likely an Erma Werke, a German automatic pistol that has close to a foot-long barrel. It looks like a small rifle and has a wood stock under the barrel. Amazingly, then a retired Wichita detective said the witness at the bridal store saw a gun he described as a short rifle. Is it memory contamination? Which is right?

A line up of composite sketches of the suspected perpetrator is frequently presented, but no individual sketch is attributed to any jurisdiction. A little digging reveals the Wichita sketch. . . but the others? The circumstances?

I was able to uncover the Raytown sketch because it appears in the window of the victim’s Store of Many Colors in a May 1992 photo taken by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The sketch that is remarkably close to the Wichita sketch I must assume is St. Charles PD’s. Then there’s an odd one that has no attribution.

I had to work police contacts just to get the address of the Houston gift shop.

Tarrant County, Texas, wherein lies Fort Worth and Arlington, cannot find the coroner reports on the victims Mary Ann Glasscock (Thacker) and Amy Vess, the first two victims of the I-35 Killer. The third victim in Houston survived, and the bullet is still in her neck. There it is going to remain, she has insisted.

There is therefore, at present, no way to draw a more concrete link between the two murder sprees classified as I-70 and I-35 killings. No one has ever proposed a type of weapon for these I-35 killings. The articles only read it was a different weapon. We are subject to the superficial regurgitation that “some suspect” there is a link. Q Files will add a little more info, though, and I am still seeking the reports.

Sedgwick County (Wichita) Forensics does not hold Medical Examiner reports back that far, so I was referred to the court. They are trying to see if they have the coroner reports for the victims there.

Nevertheless, as is stands, Q Files section Cruise to a Kill will offer much more and will sort out the contradictions and present the facts on the case.

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Since 1990 Gian J. Quasar has investigated a broad range of mysterious subjects, from strange disappearances to serial murders, earning in that time the unique distinction of being likened to “the real life Kolchak.” However, he is much more at home with being called The Quester or Q Man. “He’s bloody eccentric, an historian with no qualifications who sticks his nose into affairs and gets results.” He is the author of several books, one of which inspired a Resolution in Congress.

In Quest of D.B. Cooper

Like all unsolved mysteries, the case of D.B. Cooper is a combination of unlikely components. My new section on The Quester Files IN QUEST OF D.B. COOPER is a short summary of the events and then the introduction to a likely profile and individual.

The selection of any profile or individual is not dependent merely on finding similarities in appearance and interests, and the ability to pull off the crime. For an unsolved crime as audacious as Cooper’s, in the context in which it happened, there is an unavoidable induction. Cooper knew he was not traceable by sight. He knew he would be well-observed. Yet he knew no investigation would lead to him. He knew he could be identified only by fingerprints. He left none, and he even insisted that the note he handed the stewardess Flo Schaffner be returned to him. It wasn’t to protect his penmanship. It was fingerprints.

No one could be so bold as the man calling himself Dan Cooper unless he knew he was untraceable. History has proven this point. Even under the assumption he splattered, the FBI could find no missing person who matched the swarthy Dan Cooper.

This heavily suggests the reality behind the skyjacker calling himself Dan Cooper was someone who had left the grid long before. Not just the United States. I’m not speaking about a citizen who simply went overseas years before. I mean someone who disappeared years before and assumed a new identity, for whatever reasons.

Please keep this in mind as you explore my new Q Files section on D.B. Cooper.

Sky Jackal: In Quest of D.B. Cooper

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Since 1990 Gian J. Quasar has investigated a broad range of mysterious subjects, from strange disappearances to serial murders, earning in that time the unique distinction of being likened to “the real life Kolchak.” However, he is much more at home with being called The Quester or Q Man. “He’s bloody eccentric, an historian with no qualifications who sticks his nose into affairs and gets results.” He is the author of several books, one of which inspired a Resolution in Congress.